D-Wave quantum computer gets validation




D-Wave quantum computer gets validation

Quantum processor of the company D-Wave would indeed use quantum mechanical phenomena to solve mathematical problems. A team of researchers has tested the processor and tentatively concluded that the processor is indeed a working quantum processor.

Although the Canadian company D-Wave claims worlds to deliver first working quantum processor for years was the proof difficult to deliver. The processor in question, a chip codenamed Rainier, was nearly two years ago by research institute USC-Lockheed Martin Quantum Computing Center bought and put into operation. The Rainier processor would now, according to a group of scientists from the USC Viterbi Information Sciences Institute, where the quantum computer is housed. The results of the calculations of the computer would not correspond to classical results that processors would give, but would be consistent with quantum mechanical calculations.

The researchers used for their test only eight of the twenty-eight hundred qubits of the D-Wave processor. They let the computer search for energy optimizations, which showed that a process called quantum annealing is responsible for the results found. Classical methods of calculation would have given different results. The Rainier processor would then validated as quantum chip.

Quantum Computers must perform certain calculations than conventional processors much faster. The quantum processor of D-Wave consists of qubits 128 which are held in a superconducting state due to extreme cooling. The company now has a new chip developed which is composed of 512 qubits. The new chip, Vesuvius, the Rainier chip replaced at USC and will also be subject to validation. D-Wave Vesuvius-quantumchip


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