Documents of Turing’s method for cracking Enigma found under roof




Notes for cracking the Enigma code of the Nazis, prove to be found when restoring a code breaking facility in the English Bletchley Park. The code breakers used the paper as insulation under the roof.

The documents appear to have been found in 2013 for the restoration of Hut 6, which was codenamed Station X, Bletchley Park in the city of Milton Keynes, so message The Times. The paperwork was since then frozen for conservation and has now been restored, to be exhibited in a month. After the war, all the papers of the code breakers destroyed, but now restored works were preserved because they were placed in isolation under the roof and walls by the employees of intelligence.

Among the papers are notes taken with pencil, but also there is a Banbury Sheet at, the only copy still exists. In these papers, the letters of the ciphertext were perforated, and several sheets superimposed and were pushed. The holes that overlapped were then counted.

A high result could be factored in a hypothesis about the settings of the rotors of Enigma -Machine who used the Germans in World War II to encrypt messages. The information could thus accelerate the cracking of intercepted messages that day possible. This technique was developed by Alan Turing and is also Banburismus mentioned. The name refers to Banbury, where the cards were printed.


In: Technology & Gadgets Asked By: [15500 Red Star Level]

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