Dutch computer scientist allows virtual characters to move more naturally




Dutch computer scientist allows virtual characters to move more naturally

A PhD student at Utrecht University has devised a method to animate by muscle and nerve models to use. Lifelike movements He applied his models to two-legged, virtual beings, who learned to walk and run.

Movement patterns in animated creatures are often calculated with formulas in physics, allowing the creatures themselves rather stiff and rigid movement, but the Dutch computer scientist Thomas Geijtenbeek devised an alternative. He uses true muscle and nerve models for physically simulated bipedal characters and determined the optimal location of the muscles by trial and error.

The big difference is in accordance Geijtenbeek incorporating biological limitations. “For example, only a limited amount of muscles give strength, depending on how long they are and how fast they constrict. Neural pathways are relatively slow in relaying information, allowing people and animals with some delay responding to sensory perceptions.”

The advantage of his method is that no complex programming comes in handy to move. Creatures in a natural way The modeling of muscles and nerves automatically takes care of this. The figures their movement automatically adjust to the speed. They’ll run at higher speed or they jump like a kangaroo. Another advantage is that interact with other objects or characters will be much more realistic.

Geijtenbeek mid-December doctorate for his thesis Animating Virtual Characters using Physics-Based Simulation. He continues to use his work for research into muscle diseases, as well as game developers would like to use the method writes the University of Utrecht.


Answer this Question

You must be Logged In to post an Answer.

Not a member yet? Sign Up Now »