Dutch expert autonomous driving: Hotz is irresponsible

Apr

5

2016

The Dutch researcher Maarten autonomous vehicles Sierhuis, who works for Nissan and formerly NASA, believes that George Hotz is acting irresponsibly with his plan for an inexpensive kit for autonomous driving to deliver.

The well-known hacker George Hotz was recently million investment to develop a kit of less than thousand dollars which enables users to make their autonomous car driving. “On the one hand I think: great that he does this, on the other hand I think it’s irresponsible,” Sierhuis said at a session organized by Nissan where Tweakers was present.

The Dutchman gives Nissan leads the Nissan Research Center Silicon Valley, where the carmaker is working on the development of autonomous vehicles. A system with risks in the area of ​​security could, according to him put a brake on development. “Suppose someone with the technology that boy kill someone goes,” says Sierhuis. “Then you get huge headlines and you run the risk that the development of our technology is shut down.”

Nissan takes the cautious road to autonomous driving. “For us the motto is safety first. We start with a system for hands-free driving, with the driver to send another part itself,” says the researcher. “The part of the highway is ready, now we develop the part of the cities. it should be ready in June 2017 and 2020 should be taken into production for cars. ”

The tricky for Nissan is that it does not seek a system for expensive cars, but that it wants to handle a system in affordable cars of about 30,000 euros. “We can not like Google put a sensor of $ 40,000 on the cars.” In addition, the Japanese company wants as much as possible in-house development. “Vendors like Nvidia want their platform for autonomous driving only money, and I know that their deep learning system not nearly work as well as they promise,” Sierhuis claims.

Nissan works closely with NASA, the former employer of Sierhuis: “If you can not know what high level of security we had to offer to be able to test on the site of NASA.” That land would be ideal for such a test would work, because of the relative autonomy that exists. Nissan therefore have to conform less to the regulations that are elsewhere in force. Moreover, Nissan may use knowledge of the space agency. Additionally Sierhuis collaborates with universities like Stanford.

Cooperation between carmakers is hardly, but wants Sierhuis go into making a change: “I want to create a group of the research departments of car makers to share knowledge.” So automakers need better able to make a fist of technology companies working on autonomous driving, such as Google and Apple. “They keep their knowledge to themselves and especially want a new commercial platform for apps. When I Google a few years ago knocked to access Maps I was told ‘no’, now they are happy more open.”

One of the problems Sierhuis and his team encounter is the localization of the vehicle. “The vehicle knows exactly where he is? GPS is there insufficient. We experiment with
extended Kalman filter to solve this. “At a higher level reasoning on the basis of data and the interpretation of other road users signals difficult for the team. The latter Sierhuis a sociologist employed. Eventually Sierhuis hopes to system of, get in his words, socially acceptable humanlike driving. the biggest stumbling block for a market launch is not the technology but ultimately the rules, he thinks.

Nissan test initially only in Silicon Valley and Japan, but talks with the province of North Holland to be able to test drive here.

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