European Space Agency experiment with robot-Gekko




European Space Agency experiment with robot-Gekko

The ESA has experimented with a dry adhesive feet under robot to determine whether this agent is used in space. The trials, held in the lab ESA in Noordwijk, were successful and bring robots that can walk closer. Onto the wall of a spaceship

The European Space Agency has successfully experimented with a robot with sticky feet. According to ESA, the robot can both on Earth and in space to ever climb walls. This brings robots on the wall of a spaceship walking closer, writes the space agency on its website .

The adhesive has been tested on the so-called creeping Abigaille III robot. This gecko-like robot, which measures 120x200mm and thus is slightly smaller than a real gecko, has four legs and is designed by Simon Fraser University. The robot borrows techniques from nature. A Gecko is at the bottom of its legs hairs with a diameter of 100 to 200 nanometers. This results in atomic level interactions between the surface and the hairs, so that the sticking reptile. The adhesive hairs has one hundred times greater than that of the gecko, but that is sufficient for the weight of the robot. The idea of a robot gecko is not entirely new, as developed from Stanford University in 2006, the Stickybot .

The tests were performed in the ESA’s Electrical Materials and Process Lab in Noordwijk. The success in this test environment means that it could be necessary to run a robot. On the wall of a space vehicle, possibly on a day At this time, robots can only move on relatively smooth surfaces, but research continues to also move. Robots on rougher surfaces

The researchers from ESA, the trial in collaboration with Simon Fraser University in Canada conducted. The “dry adhesive”, present on the robot foot, is in a lab subjected to a vacuum, and the low temperatures in space. The agent retained under these circumstances, its stickiness and, therefore, can be used to climb. Robots in the space surfaces

Commonly used adhesives are useless for such applications, such as duct tape or adhesive tape, because dust and thereby collect it after a certain period of time lose their stickiness. In addition, these tapes vacuuĆ¼momgevingen sometimes give off fumes, which is a risk to the systems on board the spacecraft. Magnets are also useless, because the generated fields can affect sensitive instruments and because magnets do not work on composites.


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