Google’s robot Schaft wins DARPA contest




Google’s robot Schaft wins DARPA contest

The robot Purchased from a Japanese start-up, which was recently acquired by Google, has won the DARPA contest about rescue tasks. The competition in which 16 teams participated in eight tasks to be performed, from driving to the identification of a snake.

Darpa, the game started in response to the very limited possibilities that robots seemed to have in the wake of the Fukushima nuclear disaster, so reports the BBC. In to the match, the robots had to perform a series of tasks with a time limit of thirty minutes. Include a ladder to be climbed, a course be taken in a vehicle debris are removed, there had to be drilled a triangle shape from a wall, and a serpent had to be rolled up and the nozzle hung on the wall.

Schaft, as the robot is called, is a 1.48 meter robot that uses a new liquid-cooled engine technology. These engines operate at high voltage. According to the creators of the robot arm can thus quickly move and rotate. The machine was built by a spin-off of the Jouhou Kougaku System Lab at the University of Tokyo, that Google has acquired recently.

The videos of Darpa shows that robots are still much slower than people in performing these tasks. Sometimes, the robots had to pause to take a minute or more, while they were calculations for the next move to perform.

Schaft won with a big lead over the competition. The team took 27 of the 32 points, compared with 20 and 18 points respectively for the number two and three. Eight teams, including the Schaft team can now claim grants from DARPA to further improve their creations. They are given a little more than 700,000. There will be a final, which will be held December next year. The winner will then have an investment in his robot just under 1.5 million.


In: Technology & Gadgets Asked By: [15575 Red Star Level]

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