IBM Can Store 330 Terabytes In A Small Storage Bar

Aug

3

2017

IBM Research, Inc., in collaboration with Sony Storage Solutions, today announced that it has achieved a new world record for magnetic tape storage technology, enabling researchers to store up to 330 terabytes of uncompressed data or The equivalent of 330 million books on a single storage tape that fits the size of the palm.

The tape containing 330 terabytes of data is not yet available, at least not yet, as a theoretical prediction at this stage. Mark Lantz, IBM’s Explorational Research Scientist, has demonstrated the ability to record a 201 gigabyte Per square inch on the magnetic strip.

These figures can be seen in a different way: 201 billion bits per square inch. This density is the world’s highest storage density for the magnetic strip. According to the exploratory search, this can be translated into a potential tape capacity of 330 terabytes on a single magnetic strip.

This is IBM’s fifth record of tape storage technology since 2006, when the company’s researchers first filled 6.67 billion bits of data per square inch on a test strip.

“Above all, this shows that we can continue to expand tape storage technology and historical time-rates to double storage capacity every two years at least over the next 10 years,” Lantz said, which is really good news for companies that still rely on tape technology as part of the architecture. Storage infrastructure “.

The possibility of recording 201 gigabytes per square inch on the magnetic strip prototype is 20 times more than the current survey density available in commercial drives. The spatial recording density is the amount of information that can be stored on a particular area of ​​the surface.

Tape drives have been invented for more than 60 years and have traditionally been used to archive tax documents and health care records. The first tape from IBM used rollers of half-inch tapes, which can save up to about 2 MB.

Sony Storage Solutions developed the magnetic stripe, using video archiving, backups and replicas for disaster recovery and basic information retention, but the industry has also expanded in applications outside of cloud services.

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