North Korea stands behind WannaCry ransom attack

Jun

18

2017

British security officials believe that pirates from North Korea were behind the widespread WannaCry ransom attack , which paralyzed large parts of computers and offices of NHS doctors and hospitals in the United Kingdom and other organizations around the world last month.

According to a report published by the BBC, the NCSC led the international investigation, the sources said that the commission believes that the group of piracy known as Lazarus has launched the attack, and believes that the same group targeted Sony Pictures in 2014.

The US emergency response team also warned of Lazarus. Sony Pictures’ breakthrough came as the company planned to issue The Interview, which is about criticizing the North Korean leadership. The film was later released after the initial delay .

It is also believed that the group itself was behind the theft of funds from banks and used malicious software for ransom called WannaCry, which hit many countries around the world, encrypting computers and preventing access to information on them for ransom payments. The currency of the home.

Officials at the NCSC began their own investigations and concluded their assessment in recent weeks. The ransom program was not specifically targeted at Britain or the NHS, and it may be a scheme to get the money but it is out of control. On ransom money so far.

The first sign that this attack originated from North Korea emerged last May through Google security researcher Neel Mehta, who worked on publishing a vague set of characters via his Twitter account along with #HannaCryptAttribution.

Mehta claimed there was evidence of a similarity between the WannaCry software code and the 2015 version of the Cantopee software used by the Lazarus group, according to Kaspersky Lab’s researchers, who published similar samples of the code, one from an early version of WannaCry and the other from Lazarus.

The WannaCry software code contains a kill key, which is a way to stop the spread of malicious software, suggesting that the motives behind the attack may not be purely financial, according to Adrian Nish, a cybersecurity expert who leads the intelligence team on cyber threats BAE.

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Neel Mehta @neelmehta
9c7c7149387a1c79679a87dd1ba755bc @ 0x402560, 0x40F598
ac21c8ad899727137c4b94458d7aa8d8 @ 0x10004ba0, 0x10012AA4#WannaCryptAttribution

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