Researchers make chip-less RFID tags for at reflective surfaces




Researchers from the Australian Monash University have a printable, chip-less RFID tag developed that also works on metal objects and containers in which a liquid is in. Previously, the latter is not managed by the interference of metal and liquids.

That writes the university on its site. The tags can be printed with an inkjet printer at reflective surfaces. The tags are according Nemai Karmakar of the research the first printable, chip-less RFID tags for paper and plastics. That they would last more reliable, smaller and more cost effective than any other barcode system also thinks Karmakar.

The RFID tag operates at the 60GHz frequency range, so that the tags can be much smaller than other, existing chip-less RFID tags. Despite its small size, the tags can contain a lot of information.

Maintaining the print resolution when printing on paper and plastic was the hardest, according to the researchers, although it is a margin of error in there. The material of which the tag is printed, can be used both in cryogenic conditions as at temperatures up to above the eighty degrees Celsius.

The development of these tags is interesting because the bar code may be superfluous. At this moment it is not yet possible to scan a shopping cart at one time by means of RFID. Perhaps that is closer to the development of other printing inks.

The research is part of a research project into printable RFID tags for plastic banknotes. The overall study should be completed in 2016.


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