Scientists create sensors that can be stuck on organs




A group of Japanese scientists has developed sensors that can be applied directly to organs. This has the advantage that weak electrical signals are collected in the body that would otherwise go unnoticed.

A publication in which the discovery explains, this month published in the scientific journal Nature Communications. The Japanese researchers describe a gel-like substance that can absorb electrical signals. The material is according to the creators suitable for application directly to soft, wet tissues and therefore it is possible to collect electrical signals that are measured at the surface of organs.

Because most sensors that measure electrical pulses are hard material, they usually have to be placed outside the body, making the signals only be measured indirectly. Go so lost the weakest signals. With the material developed by the Japanese researchers so it should be possible to more accurately follow biological signals.

The material used is PVA, that the body does not reject, is very flexible and can adhere well to a variety of surfaces. The scientists test their on PVA-based sensors in rats. From the experiments it appears that sensors which are stuck on the heart of the rat three hours left in place. Also read electrical signals would be accurate.

There is still much research needed before the flexible members patches can be applied in humans. Scientists need to do long-term studies to see how long the sensors continue to work. They also need to demonstrate safety before studies in humans are allowed. Such sensors could, inter alia can be used for pacemakers, and to read out signals from the brain.


In: Technology & Gadgets Asked By: [15446 Red Star Level]

Answer this Question

You must be Logged In to post an Answer.

Not a member yet? Sign Up Now »