Solar panels are more efficient by coating that is copied from moth-eye




A group of scientists has developed a technique that ensures that solar panels reflect less light and in this way to convert the sunlight to electricity more efficiently. The developed anti-reflective layer is copied from the eyes of moths.

Researchers at the US Department of Energy responsible for the discovery and have put forth in a scientific paper in the journal Nature Communications. In the study revolves around coat a new way of solar panels. It is common to provide solar panels of an anti-reflective layer so that less sunlight is reflected back. The new nanostructure developed by US scientists has yet to effectively prevent glare than conventional coatings.

The structure of the new coating is based on the eyes of moths. These animals have a certain build-up of their eyes with so-called poles causing a great deal of light is absorbed. Moths can thereby see well in the dark. By using nanotechnology to develop the same type of structure, the anti-reflective properties of the moth eyes were found to be able to be imitated.

According to the makers of their anti-reflective layer improves the effectiveness of solar panels with about 20 percent, compared to panels that have a conventional coating. For the time being the technique works only with silicon panels, but in time also it has to work with panels that are constructed from other materials, such as glass or plastic.

Solar panels absorb sunlight and convert the energy into electricity to here. Reflected sunlight can not be used for power generation. For this reason, research is being done to improve coatings.


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