The most accurate atomic chronometer loses one second for five billion years




The most accurate atomic chronometer loses one second for five billion years

Physics, National Institute of Standards and Technology USA (The National Institute of Standards and Technology, NIST) have developed a chronometer based on strontium atoms, which set a new record of accuracy and stability.

Structure of a new timepiece is that several thousand cooled to near absolute zero strontium atoms are enclosed in an optical grating – trap the created high-intensity laser beams. Another laser causes the atoms oscillate between the energy levels.

New strontium clock running at 50% or rather the previous record holder . The closer to the true resonant clock frequency, the higher the accuracy. This timepiece capable of measuring time without errors for 5 billion years, writes

Stability is determined to find out how long atomic clocks must work to achieve the desired accuracy (the same as the time between transitions themselves). The new timepiece that period is only a few seconds, unlike previous models, which require several hours or several days.

The main competitor of the timepiece are ytterbium clock, but strontium chronometer in 2 times more accurate.

The existing 50-year-old standard, which states that the most accurate clocks are clocks based on cesium atoms , can not call the new strontium chronometer most accurate measure of the time in the world. But scientists are already considering the question of changing the standard, as strontium and ytterbium clock can operate at optical frequencies, which are significantly higher microwave frequencies used cesium clock.
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Tags: Atoms , Time , Records .


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