The US Government Warns Companies Against Piracy Targeting The Energy Sector

Jul

1

2017

This event highlights the weakness of the energy industry in the face of cyber attacks.
US government this week warned industrial companies of a breakthrough aimed at the energy and nuclear energy sector, the latest event to highlight the weakness of the energy industry in the face of cyber attacks.

According to a joint report from the US Department of Homeland Security and the US Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), electronic hackers have used at least last May “suspicious” e-mail messages to “harvest credentials” so they can access their target networks.

While the report to the industrial companies reveals the attacks, warning that in some cases the pirates have succeeded in hitting their target networks, he did not specify any specific victims. “Historically, cyber actors have targeted the energy sector strategy with different goals ranging from cyberspace to the ability to disrupt power systems in the event of an adversarial conflict.”

A virus called NotPetya was attacked on Tuesday to spread from initial infections in Ukraine to companies around the world. He also encrypted data on infected machines, making them inoperable and disrupting activity in ports, law firms and factories.

On Tuesday, E & E News, an energy industry news site, said US investigators were studying cyber-infiltration this year in many nuclear power plants.

The activity described in the US government’s June 28, 2017 report comes at a time when industrial companies are wary of the threat posed by pirates to their operations.

Industrial companies, including energy suppliers and other utilities, were particularly concerned about the possibility of devastating cyber attacks since December 2016, when pirates managed to cut electricity in Ukraine.

Two cyber security companies said on June 12 that they had identified malicious programs used in the Ukrainian attack, called Industroyer, warning that it could be easily modified to attack facilities in the United States and Europe.

Endostrore is only the second piece of malware discovered so far that can disable industrial processes without requiring hackers to intervene manually. The first piece, known as Stuxnet, was discovered in 2010 and is widely believed by security researchers that the United States and Israel have used it to attack Iran’s nuclear program.

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