TU / e develops wireless temperature sensor that extracts energy from radio waves

Dec

5

2015

The Technical University of Eindhoven has managed to develop a wireless temperature sensor whose battery never needs to be recharged. That’s because the tiny device can extract energy from wireless signals.

According to the scientists receive the chip, the energy of the wireless network to which it is connected with it, even though there is called a special router is required. This fact should send special radio waves used by the temperature sensor for energy. The signals are sent directed allowing for the transmission little electricity is needed, according to the makers.

The chip itself is about 2 square millimeters and weighs 1.6 milligrams. That makes it the lowest temperature in the world and about as heavy as a grain of sand, say scientists from the TU / e. Temperature measurements are read by radio waves, the sensor returns to the router; depending on the temperature, the signals deviate slightly in frequency, so that the temperature can be derived.

Because the temperature sensor can be used in concrete and works even when it is covered by a layer of paint there are many conceivable applications in large buildings. The processing of the sensors through the whole building, for example, can be done by the paste with a layer of latex on the wall, thus laying the TU / e out. Thereby builders have little extra to spend time with the application of the chips. Furthermore, the cost would not be high on having to walk: in mass production the cost is about 20 cents per chip, the researchers said ,.

A disadvantage of the temperature sensor is that it only has a range of 2.5 centimeters. However, the makers are hopeful that this year will be a stretched to a meter. Thereafter, they want to make a version which has a range of five meters.

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