WRR: citizens inadequately protected against analysis and use big data

Apr

29

2016

The Dutch Scientific Council for Government Policy concludes that the current rules to protect citizens inadequate because they only focus on collecting and sharing data. New rules are needed, concludes the advisory body.

The WRR breaks big data process into three stages: collection, analysis and use of data. Because the legal rules only focus at this time on the collection and sharing of data, drop analysis and use of the data being outside the rules, so that the new rules are needed. The Board does not recommend increasing the regulations on data collection, as this is a big part of the “promise of Big Data would nip in the bud.”

The Board therefore proposes a number of new core components for the use of big data, such as the codification of the responsibility of a data-processing batch and strict enforcement of the ban on automated decision-making and control of semi-automated decision making in the use phase. The latter means that a system no independent action may take on the basis of their own interpretation of data. The preference is for the board to a combination of big-data analysis and human review. The council cites the US example in which computers people establish a no-fly list without human judgment.Also need for citizens and civil society organizations, such as civil rights movements, opportunities come to making laws and policies around big data application legally keys. The WRR wants to further that new rules on the permissible margins of error in the drafting of profiles in the phase in which data are analyzed, including by strengthening supervision of the algorithms used for the analyzes.

The WRR does indicate in the report that it is not easy to identify “how and to what extent big data manifests itself in the Dutch security domain.” This is because there is often secrecy and experimental applications.

One of the core elements of the new framework should also provide more clarity on what authorities with the processing of data intended for safety. One of the concerns is, for example, that the data that has been collected for a particular purpose, can also be used for something else. All this also requires an additional investment in the knowledge of the softening of big data analysis by regulators such as the Authority’s personal data and the Commission’s monitoring of the intelligence and security services. The WRR made ​​the report at the request of the government and can be download via the advisory website.

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